Tropical BIRD WATCHING.

in a pristine preserve...

Early morning in the pristine forest of Valle Escondido is the perfect opportunity for visitors to go bird watching.

This virgin, protected valley is a corridor for many beloved birds of Costa Rica, including the Emerald Tucanet, Keel Billed Tucan, Motmot, and the endangered Bell Bird. 

Professional tours are available daily and finish back at the cafe where an included buffet meal awaits. Private Tours are also available.

TOUR DETAILS

Daily 5.30am - 8am

Minimum 2 people

Adults: $45

Students: $35

Private: $60

Summer Tanager
Summer Tanager

Migrates to Costa Rica from September to April. Can fly alone or in mixed species flocks.

Three-wattled Bell Bird
Three-wattled Bell Bird

The males assemble together at a traditional site where they vie for the attention of females through competitive vocal displays and choreographed dance performances.

Keel-billed Toucan
Keel-billed Toucan

Inhabits forest and semi-open areas. The call is a dry frog-like croak, repeated at length.

Mottled Owl
Mottled Owl

Often seen at the edge of 'Savage Brook.' Roosts fairly low in dense vegetation. Calls with deep muffled notes followed by two loud notes and an additional muffled note.

Long-tailed Manakin
Long-tailed Manakin

Active in low-middle levels of forest especially in vine-tangles. An old male and a young male usually pair up by performing synchronised vocalisations and a courtship dance, in which each male leap-frogs the other on a branch, to attract females.

Coppery-headed Emerald
Coppery-headed Emerald

One of the only three species endemic exclusively to mainland Costa Rica.

Emerald Toucanet
Emerald Toucanet

Nests in a tree cavity or a hole carved by another species. Found on all levels of canopy. Feeds on fruits, small animal prey, birds eggs and nestlings.

Sunbittern
Sunbittern

Seen in the Preserve at Sendero Canyon in river Quebrada Maquina. Emits a far-carrying forlorn rising whistle lasting about one second.

Orange-bellied Trogon
Orange-bellied Trogon

Inhabits middle levels of wet forest, forest edges and nearby pastures with tall trees. Alone, in pairs or sometimes small groups.

Blue-crowned Motmot
Blue-crowned Motmot

Multiple couples nest in a long burrow, sharing the role of protecting the eggs and young.

Masked Tityra
Masked Tityra

Often perches conspicuously in treetops. Likes figs, insects and small lizards. Called the Pajaro Chancho (pig bird) because of its oink-like calls.

Golden-olive Woodpecker
Golden-olive Woodpecker

Fairly common at middle elevations from 700 to 2000 meters. Forages in middle to upper levels of forest. Often at lower levels adjacent to second growth and gardens.

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